Internet dating always ask for a photo


There are no statistics saying just how common scammers are on dating sites.But individuals who frequent them say scams are pervasive. Match.com, for instance, includes a disclaimer at the bottom of every onsite email between members, warning not to send money or provide credit card information to anyone you've met on the site.Budgyk knows this from experience: A Nigerian scammer lifted photos from Budgyk's profile. Their photographs are also likely of someone else, and that would be tough to explain in person. He sent heart-wrenching photos of a young girl, who appeared to be his daughter's age, hooked to a raft of medical monitors.

" Moving off-site before launching a scam reduces the chance that you'll report the crook to the relevant site.

That's important to the con artist, who'll want to troll the site again for future victims when done with you.

"You see this communication and think, 'Oh my gosh, I must be more attractive than I thought! They're also likely to target people with weight problems and those recovering from illnesses. Any of these issues might make you a bit more anxious about your ability to find love and potentially more receptive to the con.

The crook will then lavish you with attention and flattery.

"Can you please send me a photo of you in a bikini? There will be no chance you can be pegged as crazy or high-maintenance on first glance.